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Body: Convertible
Colour: Caldera Black Me
Mileage: 90
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

Body: Convertible
Colour: Lipizzan White
Mileage: 5
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

Body: Hatchback
Colour: Arctic Steel Met
Mileage: 96
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 998

Croxdale Citroen
Call: 01388 814671
Body: Convertible
Colour: Lipizzan White
Mileage: 100
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 998

Chevron Motors Ltd
Call: 01905429999
Body: Hatchback
Colour: Blue Lagoon
Mileage: 150
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

BCC Citroen Wigan
Call: 01942 446 446
Body: Hatchback
Colour: BLUE
Mileage: 1460
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

Springfield Citroen Gateshead
Call: 0191 477 9999
Body: Hatchback
Colour: Red
Mileage: 1000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 998

GT Garages
Call: 01723 360791
Body: Hatchback
Colour: BLACK
Mileage: 6
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

Springfield Citroen Gateshead
Call: 0191 477 9999
Body: Hatchback
Colour: Carlinite Grey M
Mileage: 500
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1199

Chevron Motors Ltd
Call: 01905429999
Body: Hatchback
Colour: Scarlet Red
Mileage: 10
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 998

Chevron Motors Ltd
Call: 01905429999

Citroen C1 Review

The Citroen C1 was among the frontrunners of vehicles that offered a small size and a cheap yet fuel-efficient performance. The C1 has been doing this since 2005, with only the Peugeot 107 and Toyota Argo catching up to Citroen’s original features. The vehicles continues to be an affordable options in the market, especially for parents that need a second car or younger drivers that need somethings convenient and within the budget. Unfortunately its refinement isn’t as smooth as it should be and space tends to be limited at the boot and the rear seats.

Pros

The next generation Citroen C1 has been facelifted once again, but its dominant changes being in its updated appearance. Noticeable changes include  a shorter bonnet, a brand new front end, as well as a redesigned front bumper that is sporting LED daytime running lights and house fog lights. The cabin bears little changes and the C1 itself still maintains its famous chunky, simple look.

The C1 comes as either a five- or three-door car and comes in three trim levels. The top variation within this range is the VTR+ that includes alloy wheels and airconditioning as a standard.

All models have a 998cc engine at 68bhp and at 70lb ft in torque at 3600rpm. Paired with a five-speed manual gearbox, the C1 can quickly arrive to 62mph in just 13.7 seconds. The top speed for all C1 types is at 98mph. Emissions have been lessened at 99g/km in the manual, making the C1 one of the first petrol-powered vehicles that makes it below the 100g/km mark. In terms of noise, the engine is nippy enough when going through an urban crawl.

The slick gearbox, easy clutch, and light steering make the C1 an easy drive through urban roads. Parking, manoeuvring, and your turning circle won’t be a problem either given these features.

The cabin still retains familiar elements that worked for the previous generation. The space may be small, but drivers will appreciate the all-around visibility and the glass area that gives you the illusion of spaciousness. The overall appearance still manages to be fresh, and even distinguishes itself with a cylindrical heater control panel. Space is generous for the front-seat passenger and driver, but legroom slightly compromised for every other body part. Taller passengers may a have a problem fitting in the front area.

Cons

Unfortunately space is limited in the rear seat area and the boot volume limited at 139 litres. Expect such a size given how small the C1 was designed to be a compact vehicle. But you can make extra room by dropping the 50/50 split-fold rear seats. Plus the cabin includes extra cubbies for extra storage space.

The driving position is generally decent, but the lack of height adjustment on the seat limits driving visibility and comfort. The engine requires extra effort as well, with high revs being demanded throughout most of the ride. Gear shifts aren’t smooth and end up losing the momentum you initially established. And although the C1 is great along city roadways, it doesn’t perform as well on rougher and more difficult road conditions. 

What do you think?

(Average rating: 5 , Total rates: 2 )

A quick look at the Citroen C1

First introduced in the market in 2005, the Citroen C1 is a city car developed as part of a joint-venture between PSA Peugeot Citroen and Toyota called the B-Zero Project. The joint venture provided PSA Peugeot Citroen and Toyota with shared facilities and resulted into similarities between the C1 and the Toyota Aygo and the Peugeot 107. The C1’s body was designed by Donato Coco, an Italian automobile designer. He was also responsible for the designs behind the Citroen C2 and C3 Pluriel.

In the UK, there are special editions of the C1. First, there’s Cool, which is based off the Vibe model with added air conditioning and blue-coloured seat fabrics and dashboard inserts. And second, there’s Airplay, which is based off the Rhythm model with added iPod connectivity and an included 4GB iPod Nano plus coloured door pulls and dashboard inserts. The Vibe and Rhythm models are part of the Trim Range which is also available in the UK.

In 2009 and 2012, the Citroen C1 was given a facelift alongside the Toyota Aygo and Peugeot 107. The most recent changes included a new bumper, a different shade of blue for the exteriors, new LED daylights, improved fuel economy, a new CD player, and a new steering wheel.

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