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Body: Saloon
Colour: Silver
Mileage: 15771
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 2000

thecarwarehouse.co.uk
Call: 01642 232321
Body: Estate
Colour: Black
Mileage: 56887
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Saloon
Colour: Yellow
Mileage: 56000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Estate
Colour: Silver
Mileage: 56000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Estate
Colour: Silver
Mileage: 65000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Estate
Colour: Silver And Black
Mileage: 50000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Saloon
Colour: White
Mileage: 68000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Saloon
Colour: White
Mileage: 59500
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Saloon
Colour: Sivler
Mileage: 79000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539
Body: Saloon
Colour: White
Mileage: 67000
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Manual
Engine: 1998

DCY Europe
Call: 01347878539

Mitsubishi Lancer Review

The Mitsubishi Lancer was released as the company’s  alternative to the top selling Evo models. The Lancer Sportback’s five-door hatchback is one model among them that has been released for buyers with families. The Sportback shares the same front-end styling as the Evo X. But if you’re after the good looks of the Evo, the front-end styling is the only feature the Hatchback shares with its sister vehicle.

Pros

Thankfully the Mitsubishi Lancer Sportback performs where it matters. You can have either a 1.8-litre petrol or a 2.0-litre diesel engine in the vehicle. The 1.8-litre engine is the better and preferred choice of most users. This engine can cover 62mph in just 10.6 seconds. You can either have a five-speed manual gearbox or a CVT automatic with the petrol engine. But the 2.0-litre diesel engine performs better on the road thanks to its 140bhp feature. The fuel economy is also quiet efficient at 45mpg.

The Lancer Sportback handles riding quiet well. The ride is smooth overall, preventing passengers from feeling rough surfaces and bumps on the road. The drive is also surefooted and enjoyable thanks to the stability control system and standard fir traction. Steering is responsive if it has to be, but you could face some difficulty as the wheel lacks some feeling and tends to be too light at times.

The Mitsubishi Lancer Sportback has three trim levels: the GS2, GS3, and GS4. The first type comes with steering wheel mounted stereo controls, electrically adjustable door mirrors, electric windows, a leather steering wheel, cruise control, and 16-inch alloy wheels. The GS3’s upgrades include front dog lights, stability and traction control, 18-inch alloy wheels, and traction control. The GS4 has the most futuristic equipment such as a touch screen sat nav system, heated leather seats, and 30GB music. All cabins offer comfortable padded seats and the rear legroom enough for average sized passengers. Taller individuals, however, will have to squeeze themselves in due to the lack of headroom.

Cons

Although both engines offer adequate performance, both aren’t very quiet on the road. The CVT automatic tends to be on high revs, the petrol requiring an extra rev to get the right pace, and the diesel engine clattering during start up. Thankfully wind noise is muted and doesn’t add to the distracting noise of these engines. The five-speed manual gearbox isn’t highly recommended as it strains the engine when the car’s performance becomes off.

The Lancer was able to pass all of the Euro NCAPs’ 2009 crash tests. The vehicle has been declared child and pedestrian safe, as well as adult occupant safe. The Lancer was also able to pass the rear impact whiplash test with a maximum of five stars. Safety is also guaranteed via the seven airbags, Isofix child seat mountings, electric anti-trapping windows, and three-point seatbelts with pretensioners and outer force limiters. The GS2 doesn’t include stability and traction control, but the GS3 and GS4 models include this feature as a default. Unfortunately the GS2 doesn’t even include the control feature as an additional option. 

What do you think?

(Average rating: 5 , Total rates: 3 )

Through the years: The Mitsubishi Lancer

The Mitsubishi Lancer has been around since 1973 and since then it’s been called by numerous names depending on the country it’s being sold in. From 1973 to2000, it was classified as a subcompact car and from 2000 to the present it’s categorized as a compact vehicle. Between 1973 and 2008, there were more than six million Lancers sold all over the world. Related vehicles to the Lancer include the Chrysler Sebring, Dodge Avenger, Proton Inspira, and Chrysler 200.

The first Lancer to enter the market was known as the A70 and it was meant to bridge the gap between the Galant and the Minica kei car. After the A70, the Lancer EX was revealed in Japan in 1979. Then in 1998, a Mirage-based Lancer called Colt was made available. The Lancer Cedia then replaced the Colt in 2000. The latest Lancer model was first revealed as a concept in 2005 and was officially released in 2007 as part of the 2008 model year.

In Europe, the Mitsubishi Lancer comes with two trim levels called the Invite (Sportback) and the Base (sedan), with petrol and diesel engine options also made available. Buyers in Europe need to be mindful of specifications though as these may differ depending on where the Lancer is being sold.

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