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Body: Station Wagon
Colour: Ara Blue Metalli
Mileage: 100
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

R N Golden
Call: 01484 608060
Body: Estate
Colour: Ara Blue Metalli
Mileage: 100
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

R N Golden
Call: 01484 608060
Body: Estate
Colour: Ara Blue Metalli
Mileage: 100
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

Isuzu R N Golden Limited
Call: 01484 839254
Body: Estate
Colour: Blue
Mileage: 1200
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

BCC Isle of Man
Call: 01624 878 799
Body: Estate
Colour: Phantom Black
Mileage: 658
Fuel: Petrol
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1598

Eden Hyundai Basingstoke
Call: 01256 355221
Body: Station Wagon
Colour: Micron Grey Meta
Mileage: 300
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

R N Golden
Call: 01484 608060
Body: Estate
Colour: Micron Grey Meta
Mileage: 300
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

R N Golden
Call: 01484 608060
Body: Estate
Colour: Micron Grey Meta
Mileage: 300
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

Isuzu R N Golden Limited
Call: 01484 839254
Body: Four Wheel Dr
Colour: Silver
Mileage: 5600
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

Franklins Limited
Call: 01624 830800
Body: Station Wagon
Colour: Polar White
Mileage: 100
Fuel: Diesel
Gearbox: Automatic
Engine: 1995

R N Golden
Call: 01484 608060

Hyundai Tucson Review

The Hyundai Tucson offers more than just affordability for its 4x4 structure. Standard equipment is generous even on an entry-level trim, but all variations are able to deliver the off road capability 4x4 buyers are after in this kind of vehicle. You won’t have any problems driving through the toughest terrain. You also won’t have any problems driving the car thanks to its body control and corner handling. The diesel engine also comes highly recommended.

Pros

The 2.0-litre diesel engine is the best of the Tucson range. At first it was released as a 138bhp but was given a power boost in 2008 via a rebadged CRDi  at 148bhp. The engine has no problems pulling from low revs; plus the extra power can arrive at 62mph after just 11.6 seconds. The revised engine is also more economical than the previous unit.

The Tucson manages to handle on road conditions such as corners and minimal body roll even if it’s meant to be an off roader. The vehicle is also able to maintain enough grip. Motorway journeys are relatively comfortable, but expect that as an off roader it can’t get comfortable around town. The Tucson is available either as a front-wheel or four-wheel drive only model. The 4x4 version employs an on-demand system that runs the front wheel drive so it detects traction loss. Off-road terrain conditions would require a permanent four-wheel drive that reaches up to 21mph.

The Tucson is home to a spacious cabin as well as soft and wide seats. Electric windows and air conditioning come as standard equipment in all models. Boot space is generous at 540 litres but this volume is smaller than off roader rivals like the Toyota RAV4. Rear seats can be split and folded at 60/40, resulting in a flat load space that can fit large and boxy objects. There’s also extra stowage space care of a tray under the passenger seat and a deep cuppy between the front seats.

Cons

The diesel engines are usually the more popular choice since the petrol engines tend to be unresponsive and slow on the road. The 2.7-litre V6 sounds extra powerful in its numbers but the automatic gearbox it comes with tends to limit the engine and slows down its pace. Handling is decent along corners, but the ride isn’t kept comfortable along uneven roads. Steering could also use more precision; rivals easily beat the Tucson in this aspect.

The cabin sports a rather boring and drab design made of gray plastics. The material seems cheap and tends to scratch easily. The leather on the seats are also too thin and appear low rent. Drivers will also have a problem with the lack of reach adjustment on the steering column. Thankfully the layout is easy to navigate and features such as climate control are easy to operate. Instrument dials are also clear and not difficult to look for. The high mounted gear also has a practical position but like the rest of the cabin, is made of cheap material. 

What do you think?

(Average rating: 5 , Total rates: 1 )

A History of the Hyundai Tucson

The Hyundai Tucson is a compact crossover SUV first launched in 2004 at the Chicago Auto Show. Its popularity among car enthusiasts was attested when the Tucson received the Best New Crossover award the following year from the Canadian Car of the Year. It was also named one of the most reliable SUVs in 2009.

The Tucson, more known in Europe as the ix35, was built using an Elantra-based platform. Many alterations were made to the first generation. Minimal changes were done in 2006, 2007, and 2009, including restyling, trimming, cladding, upholstery and climate systems. A fuel cell electric vehicle version was made in 2005 to test Hyundai’s second generation hydrogen-based fuel cell. An Italian version was also released from 2005-2009 which came in petrol or LPG engine options. In the UK, the CRTD Xenith was marketed starting 2007 to 2009, a version in 6-speed manual 4 wheel drive.

The second generation Tucson was first introduced at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show. Rebranded the ix35, the new Tucson was more fuel efficient and powerful than its predecessor. The ix35 was based on the concept car ix-onic, and finalised by Thomas Buerkle to promote a more fluid contour. Interior and exterior features were upgraded. In 2011, a US version with improved trim was offered.

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